Closed for Maintenance

 

 

“THE GENERAL PUBLIC IS ADVISED THAT THE BOTANICAL GARDEN WILL BE CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC THIS FRIDAY 18 MAY, FOR SCHEDULE MAINTENANCE, AND WILL BE REOPEN TO THE PUBLIC ON SATURDAY 19 MAY. ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSED IS DEEPLY REGRETTED.”

 

FROM: NATIONAL PARKS, RIVERS AND BEACHES AUTHORITY

CONTACT: MR. GORDON SHALLOW

PHONE: 784 453 1623   

 

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

 

“Please be informed that the following sites - Botanical Garden,Rawacou Recreation Park, Layou Petroglyph Park, Walliabou Heritage Park, Dark View Falls, Cumberland Beach Recreation Park, Vermont Nature Trail, Belmont Lookout and La Soufriere / Bamboo Range,  Black Point Heritage and Recreation Park and Owia Salt Pond will be closed to the General Public on Friday, 30th March, 2018 “Good Friday”.

 

All sites will be re-opened to the general public on the 31st March, 2018.

 

 

 

 

National Parks Rivers and Beaches Authority regrets any inconvenience caused.

 

Vincentians, prepare yourselves for another mind blowing musical evening with awesome talent.

 

Presenting, Roost Fusion 

Keep posted form more info

                                                         

A Botanical Christmas

The St. Vincent and the Grenadines Botanical Garden “Nine Nights of Lights” was adjudged the winner in the best lit Garden in the National Nine Morning and Lighting Competition for 2017.  Beginning December 16th through December 23rd 2017, the Botanical Garden glowed in vibrant lights that dazzle and awe with thousands of colored, twinkling bulbs. The festive event drew hundreds of patrons, who traveled to see creatively designed holiday-themed attractions. The opening on Saturday, 16th December began with live performance from the St. Vincent & The Grenadines Police Force Band and Ms. Stacy Lyttle.

 The nightly events included: Dance Night; Gospel Night; Drum Night; Movie Night; Steel Pan Night and Calypso Night. The Nine Nights of Lights was was created to coincide with the National Nine Mornings festival and was sponsored by: The National Nine Morning Committee, St. Vincent & The Grenadines Tourism Authority, Right Stuff, St. Vincent Brewery Limited, Mustique Company Limited, St. Vincent & The Grenadines National Trust, St. Hill Insurance, Nature Care SVG Ltd., BRAGSA, National Lotteries Authority of St. Vincent & The Grenadines, and Randy’s Supermarket.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plant Conservation Initiative at the Botanical Garden:

 

On the 1st of March 2017, Headstart Preschool undertook a field trip to the Botanical Garden in Kingstown to tour the grounds and learn some more information about the research taking place within the Garden. Twenty two students and three teachers were in attendance to learn about the propagation techniques being used for the Soufriere tree, which is the national flower of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. There is currently only 1 known specimen of this tree in existence, which is found at the Botanical Garden.

 

In January of 2017, Mr. Gordon Shallow, the Curator of the Botanical Garden at the National Parks, Rivers, and Beaches Authority commenced a plant propagation program with grant funding support from the SVG Preservation Fund for the “Lignum Vitae and Soufriere tree as flagship species for conservation and biodiversity preservation” in an attempt to re-introduce and promote the sustainability of these two very significant species. There are two methods being used to propagate the Soufriere tree, live cutting propagation and air layering. The live cutting method involves removing a fresh branch from the living tree, applying rooting hormone to the branch, and transplanting this branch into a growth medium. Research suggests that the branch will sprout its own roots and eventually become its own sapling. The second method, air layering, involves removing the bark (including the outer cambium of xylem and phloem) while a branch is still on the actual tree, applying root hormone to the exposed area, and covering the area with a growth medium (potting soil) then covering with foil or plastic. Research again suggests that the exposed area will sprout roots. Once the branch sprouts its own roots it can then be transplanted to a different location and begin growing on its own.

 

The students from Headstart preschool were exposed to the various methods of propagation and were allowed to tour the Botanical Garden, including the nursery where the transplanted saplings are located. The students were able to identify the Soufriere tree saplings and learned about the importance of the tree to the history of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

 

 

Students stand under the only Soufriere tree currently found on St. Vincent and the Grenadines

 

 

         

                                     

 

 

 

 

 

Students learning about the Soufriere tree flower

 

 

                                                        

 

                                                             

 

 

 

Students successfully identify the transplanted Soufriere tree saplings

Government of SVG

 

 

Contact the gardens

Telephone: (1 784) 4935824

Email: botanicgardens@hotmail.com